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Auteurs primés

Emanuele Trevi, Italie

A propos de l'auteur:

Emanuele Trevi est né à Rome en 1964. Il est écrivain et critique littéraire. Fils de Mario Trevi, un psychanalyste jungien, il a écrit quelques essais et corrigé des éditions de classiques. Il a été directeur artistique pour l’éditeur Fazi et a dirigé une anthologie avec Marco Lodoli.

Trevi a écrit de nombreuses critiques de poètes et d’écrivains, dont l’une sur le poète Pietro Tripodo qui lui a valu le Prix Sandro Onofri.

Il travaille en ce moment pour Rai 3 Radio, pour le programme Lucifer. Trevi a également été membre du jury de plusieurs prix littéraires et a écrit pour des revues telles que Il Caffè Illustrato et Nuovi Argomenti, et divers journaux nationaux, comme  La Repubblica, La Stampa, et Il Manifesto.

Editeur:

Ponte alle Grazie è un marchio Adriano Salani Editore S. p. A.
Via Gherardini 10 - 20145 Milano
Tel +39 0234597626 - Fax +39 0234597206
http://www.ponteallegrazie.it/

Contact person: Francesco Vendola (Head of the press department) ufficiostampa@ponteallegrazie.it

Agent / Directeur des droits:

Marco Vigevani
marco@marcovigevani.com

Droits étrangers:

Livre primé:

Qualcosa di scritto (Something Written)

Synopsis:

Rome, au début des années 90. Un écrivain d’une trentaine d’années, cynique et naïf, trouve du travail comme archiviste,  pour le Fonds Pier Paolo Pasolini, où il rencontre une femme acariâtre, Laura Betti. La rencontre avec la folle héroïne de ce roman, héritier spirituel du poète Friulian, est une rencontre avec Pasolini lui-même. Parallèlement, une histoire cachée  dans Petrolio, le roman inachevé de Pasolini, devient un guide, celui du désenchantement de notre époque et des mystères de la vie. Qualcosa di scritto est l’histoire d’un adieu à l’adolescence et à une ère, et explore les éternels secrets de la vie.

Extrait:

Translated by Ann Goldstein

Among the many—too many—people who worked for Laura Betti at the Pier Paolo Pasolini Foundation in Rome, all of them endowed with a colorful store of more or less unpleasant memories, I believe that I can boast of, if nothing else, above-average endurance. Not that I was at all spared the extravagant daily persecution that the Madwoman (as I soon took to calling her, in my own mind) felt it her duty to inflict on her subordinates. On the contrary, I was so irredeemably odious to her (there is no more precise word) that I succeeded in plucking all the strings of her protean sadism: from the ceaseless invention of humiliating nicknames to real physical threat. Every time I entered the offices of the Foundation, in a dark, massive corner building on Piazza Cavour, not far from Castel Sant’Angelo, I sensed almost physically the animal hostility, the uncontrollable rage that flashed, like the zigzag lightning in a comic book, from behind the lenses of her big square sunglasses. The standard greetings immediately followed. “Good morning, little slut, did you finally figure out that it’s time to GIVE HIM YOUR ASS? Or do you think you can still get away with it?!? But you don’t fool ME, you sweet-talking little slut, it takes a lot more than someone like you”—and this first blast of amenities was ended only by the eruption of a laugh that seemed to come from a subterranean cavern, and was made more threatening by the counterpoint of an indescribable sound halfway between a roar and a sob. Very rarely could the avalanche of insults dumped on the unfortunate victim be traced back to meaningful concepts. Besides, as a general rule, the Madwoman detested meaning, in every form. There was no human instrument that in her hands did not become a dangerously explosive device. And language was no exception. Her tirades revolved on the pivot of an offensive epithet, savored with pleasure and constantly repeated, as if the gist of the conversation resided there, in the pure formulation of the insult. If addressed to a male, the epithet was generally feminine. Even people she liked, and admired, had to put up with this sort of symbolic emasculation. Alberto Moravia, for example, to whom she was very attached, at a certain point became “grandma,” and there was nothing to be done about it. The entire remainder of the conversation, once the insult had been uttered, was pure and simple improvisation—a Piranesian prison of malevolence and contempt, heedless of logic and syntax. “

Plus d'informations sur l'auteur avec extrait en v.o. et EN ou FR (PDF)

Autres travaux:

I cani del nulla. Una storia vera 2003

ISBN 9788806164188 - Torino: Einaudi

L'onda del porto. Un sogno fatto in Asia 2005

ISBN-10: 8842077704 - ISBN-13: 978-8842077701 Roma-Bari: Laterza

Il libro della gioia perpetua 2010

ISBN ISBN: 17039444 Milano: Rizzoli